The Expedition Training Framework

The revised Expedition Training Framework for Hillwalking

This is written for Leaders, but it helps everybody understand what is required, and why we have to do things in a certain way. This is a slightly simplified version for Hillwalking. There are additional requirements for Biking, Canoeing etc.

There is a link to the full version at the end.

Before starting their qualifying expedition, for all 9 sections,
participants must understand and demonstrate the following:

  1. FIRST AID AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

Knowing what to do in the case of an accident or emergency.  

Summoning help, e.g., what people need to   know, telephoning for help, written message.  

Resuscitation; checking the airway, breathing and circulation.  

The treatment of blisters, cuts, abrasions, minor burns and scalds, headaches, insect bites, sunburn, and splinters.  

The recognition of more serious conditions such as sprains, strains, dislocations, and broken limbs.  

Recognition and treatment of hypothermia and heatstroke.  

The treatment of wounds and bleeding.  

Treatment for shock.  

Getting help, self-help and waiting for help to arrive, keeping safe and warm, and helping people to find you.  

  1. AN AWARENESS OF RISK AND HEALTH AND SAFETY ISSUES

Appropriate expedition fitness for their planned expedition in the appropriate mode of travel.

How to identify and avoid hazards appropriate to the environment, including using any specialised equipment for the team goal.  

The importance of keeping together and telling people where you are going.  

Knowing how, where and when to obtain weather forecasts, relating weather forecasts to observed conditions, and looking for signs which indicate changes in the weather.  

Understand safe manual handling techniques for all the equipment that might be in use, e.g., rucksacks. 

  1. NAVIGATION, ROUTE PLANNING AND COMPASS SKILLS

The ability to create a route card or plan, with timings and distances that enable them to follow a planned route and plot their progress throughout the day

An understanding of scale and how to measure distance and estimate time

How to orientate their map correctly and choose the right direction of travel

How to identify a point on the map to add it to a route card or give the information to others using grid reference

The ability to follow a planned route

Their ability to locate their position from the map 

Their ability to identify appropriate features from the map to assist navigation or location finding and understand how these features may affect journey times e.g., contour lines

How to use appropriate wayfinding equipment such as compasses or GPS devices and identify problems and issues that might arise with such tools

Actions to be taken if lost or navigating in restricted visibility

How to look after their compass and the influence of ferrous metal objects

Direction from the compass, both cardinal (N,S,E,W) and the four intercardinal points (NE,SE,SW,NW)

Navigating using a compass e.g., setting the map, determining the direction of footpaths or direction of travel, travelling on a bearing

  1. ACCOMMODATION, EQUIPMENT, AND HYGIENE

How to choose suitable clothing, footwear, and emergency equipment, and know how to use it. 

Choosing and caring for any equipment used for the overnight element. 

That equipment can be packed into rucksacks and be waterproofed appropriately. 

Always keeping equipment weight to a minimum (about a quarter of the body weight when walking) and distributed appropriately. 

That they can set up their overnight accommodation with arrangements for water, cooking, sanitation, refuse disposal, and fire precautions. 

  1. FOOD AND COOKING

Cooking and the use of stoves.  

Safety procedures and precautions which must be observed when using stoves and handling fuels.  

That they can follow the stove safety instructions.  

Cooking substantial meals as a team under expedition conditions.  

That food is stored and prepared in a safe manner. 

  1. COUNTRYSIDE AND HIGHWAY CODES

The spirit and content of the Countryside Code.  

The avoidance of noise and disturbance to local communities.  

Thorough knowledge of the Highway Code with special emphasis on walking.  

  1. OBSERVATION RECORDING AND PRESENTATIONS  

How to choose an expedition team goal.   

Observation skills and different methods of recording information.  

Skills relevant to the method of presentation.  

Researching relevant information.  

8. TEAM BUILDING  

That they have learnt to work together as an effective and cohesive unit. 

That they understand the different roles within a team, and each person can carry out some of these roles. 

  1. Proficiency in the mode of travel – WALKING

That they know how to walk carrying a rucksack in different terrains.

See the complete Framework from the DofE.